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COVID-19 Vaccination FAQ

Covid-19 vaccination at Longstreet Clinic

The following is a list of frequently asked questions about COVID-19 vaccine availability at Longstreet Clinic, as well as additional information about the vaccines themselves. While we expect to continue adding capacity thanks to increased availability of vaccine inventory, our team is working through all requests as quickly as we can so that we can vaccinate as many people who wish to receive the shot as possible. Thank you for your patience.

Last updated May 28, 2021

IS LONGSTREET CLINIC CURRENTLY PROVIDING THE COVID-19 VACCINE?

Yes.

Longstreet Clinic has been approved by the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) as a Vaccine Site for our employees, our patients and the community.

In early January we began vaccinating our staff, as well as those who qualified as eligible under Phase 1a+, most of them patients 65 and older as well as first responders and healthcare workers. We continue providing the vaccine to those eligible under expanded state guidelines as our supply allows (those 12 and older).

We have created and continue to modify a regular schedule to administer the vaccine by appointment, which includes clinics on multiple days each week in Gainesville and at least one day every weekend as our inventory dictates. We are also beginning to plan pop-up clinics that may include walk-in availability. We also have scheduled clinics at several of our Pediatrics locations.

WILL LONGSTREET CLINIC HAVE THE PFIZER, MODERNA & JOHNSON & JOHNSON VACCINES?

Yes, we are administering all three vaccines that have received the FDA’s Emergency Use Authorization to date.

WHO CAN BE ADDED TO THE WAIT LIST/RECEIVE A VACCINE VIA LONGSTREET CLINIC?

You do not have to be a patient to be vaccinated for COVID-19 at Longstreet Clinic. You do, however, have to be eligible under Georgia Department of Public Health guidelines. As of May 11, 2021, all Georgians 12 and over are eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Currently, Pfizer is the only vaccine approved for use for children who age 12 to 17. The Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines are approved for those 18 and older only (Moderna announced positive results in trials for ages 12 and older; the manufacturer could gain FDA approval – under emergency use authorization – as early as June. Additional trials and testing for children and teens are underway.

I AM ELIGIBLE UNDER CURRENT GUIDELINES. HOW CAN I RECEIVE THE VACCINE AT LONGSTREET CLINIC?

You do not have to be a current patient to receive the vaccine from us. If you are a Georgian 12 and older), you can:

  • Call 678-207-4402 and follow the prompts. You will be asked to leave a message including your name, date of birth and phone number. Our staff will add you to our list and call you to schedule an appointment when available.
  • If you are a current Longstreet Clinic patient eligible to received the vaccine, you also can call your provider or your child’s pediatrician and ask to be scheduled.
  • Additionally, as our inventory increases, we are working to add the ability to schedule an appointment via MyChart in the future.

Vaccines are by appointment only.

WHAT SHOULD I KNOW ABOUT VACCINATING MY 12 AND OLDER CHILD?

Children do NOT have to be Longstreet Clinic patients to receive the vaccine here. Those who wish to place their children age 12 and older on our list for a vaccine appointment may do so by calling our vaccine line at 678-207-4402. If your child is a patient at Longstreet Clinic Pediatrics or Family Medicine, you can also call the provider’s office.

We have received lots of questions about vaccinating children and were recently able to host an information session that included pediatrician, other medical experts and school officials.

You can watch that here:

I HAVE AN APPOINTMENT FOR THE VACCINE AT LONGSTREET CLINIC. WHERE DO I GO AND WHAT CAN I EXPECT?

Thank you for your patience in making an appointment. When you arrive at our Gainesville campus before your appointment, we encourage you to do so from the west via Prior Street.

View a map

One block of Broad Street, between Prior and Spring streets, has been closed to thru traffic, but patients with appointments for the vaccine should continue past the barrier along Broad to the designated parking area, which will be on your left if you arrive from the west. Once parked, please proceed across the street via the crosswalk and enter the building via Entrance A (look for the large blue “A”).

For the safety of our patients and our staff, masks are required within our facilities.

Registration will be on your left as you enter. You will be asked to complete paperwork before receiving the vaccine. Once you receive the vaccine, you will be required to stay for an observation period lasting from 15 to 30 minutes based on your medical history. We have seating spaced throughout our facility and invite you to enjoy complimentary wi-fi access as you wait.

For more information about traffic closures and parking, click here.

HOW MUCH WILL IT COST TO RECEIVE TO RECEIVE THE COVID-19 VACCINE AT LONGSTREET CLINIC?

The vaccine is provided free of charge. Commercial insurance, Medicare, Medicaid and other payors typically cover the cost for the provider to administer the vaccine, so you may be asked for insurance information when you check in for your appointment. Longstreet Clinic will not bill you for any fees associated with administering the vaccine.

For patients without health insurance or whose insurance does not provide coverage of the vaccine, the administrative charge will be billed to the Provider Relief Fund.

WILL I BE ABLE TO GET THE VACCINE AT MY PRIMARY CARE OFFICE?

Due to the complexity of the current situation as well as CDC and DPH requirements, we have established a centralized vaccine site at the Gainesville Campus.

All vaccines are administered in an accessible site on the first floor or third floor of our Gainesville campus at 725 Jesse Jewell Parkway SE at the entrance closest to Broad Street. Our staff is ready to assist you with directions upon entering the building as described above.

Vaccines are given by appointment only. Recently we held a vaccine clinic at our Demorest primary care office as well as several of our Pediatrics offices. Over time we will continue to evaluate our ability to provide vaccines at additional locations.

Common questions about COVID-19 vaccines

The following information is related to the vaccines, possible side effects, etc.

Last updated May 28, 2021

IS THE NEW COVID-19 VACCINE SAFE?

Safety is assessed in clinical trials that are studied by independent experts. They ensure safety in multiple ways including:

  1. Monitoring trial participants. How? Most side effects occur within 6 weeks of vaccine administration. The FDA has required 8 weeks of safety monitoring so it can track side effects.
  2. Number of trial participants. The FDA advises a minimum of 3,000 trial participants. Trials for COVID-19 vaccines included 30,000-50,000 participants.
PFIZER, MODERNA OR JOHNSON & JOHNSON? IS ONE VACCINE 'BETTER' THAN THE OTHERS?

All three vaccines have been shown to be effective at preventing symptomatic COVID-19, hospitalization and death. What matters most is that you get one.

The Moderna and Pfizer vaccines require two doses, and both doses should come from the same manufacturer. With Pfizer-BioNTech, your second dose should come approximately 21 days after the first; with Moderna, approximately 28 days. If you receive the first dose of one of these through Longstreet Clinic, your second dose appointment will be scheduled while you are here for the first shot.

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine requires just one dose.

WHY DO WE NEED TWO DOSES OF CERTAIN COVID-19 VACCINES?

Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech require two doses to get the most protection. This is to make sure your body has enough antibodies to fight the disease. The vaccines are considered about 52% effective after the first dose. After the second dose, effectiveness has been demonstrated at more than 94%.

The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is formulated to require one dose only.

However, receiving the vaccine does not mean you are immediately protected, so please continue to wear masks, social distance and practice frequent hand hygiene. Maximum protection usually occurs about 2 weeks after the final dose. Research is ongoing on whether or not vaccinated individuals are still capable of spreading COVID-19 even if they are asymptomatic, so health experts recommend you continue to wear mask until further notice.

The CDC continues to update additional guidance for those who are fully vaccinated. You can find that information here.

WHAT HAPPENS IF I MISS MY WINDOW FOR GETTING THE SECOND DOSE?

You can still get your second dose a few days or even a few weeks later. It is important that you receive the second dose in order to reach maximum protection.

CAN PREGNANT WOMEN RECEIVE THE VACCINE?

Pregnant women were not included in the initial clinical trial studies. While the vaccine MAY be beneficial for some high-risk pregnant women, our recommendation is that women discuss the vaccine with their obstetrician.

CAN CHILDREN BE VACCINATED?

The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine is approved for ages 12 and older. The Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines are currently approved for ages 18 and older only. Additional trials are underway.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS?

Most people do not experience any major issues after vaccination. Your arm may be sore, red or warm to touch. You may get a headache, fever, or muscle aches. These are signs that the vaccine is causing a response in your body’s immune system – reacting and creating antibodies to fight off the virus. It does not mean you are getting COVID-19, just that the vaccine is doing its job. These minor side effects may last up to a week after vaccination, though usually no more than a few days.

On April 13, 2021, the FDA and CDC recommended a temporary pause in administration of the Johnson & Johnson vaccination in order to further explore a rare side effect of blood clots in certain groups. As of that date, only six cases in nearly 7 million doses had been reported. Approximately 10 days later, the recommendation was made to resume use of the J&J vaccine. Investigators said there was possibly a correlation between the shot and those very rare side effects, but the benefits outweighed the risks.

WILL THE VACCINE GIVE ME COVID-19?

The vaccines do not contain live or killed viral particles, so none can give you COVID-19. In some cases a person may already be infected with COVID-19 when they get the vaccine. If they later test positive for it, it does not mean they got COVID-19 from the vaccine.

The vaccines do NOT contain:

  • Live COVID19 virus
  • Egg products
  • Blood products
  • Beef products
  • Pork products
  • Government tracking devices
WHEN WILL WE BE PROTECTED AFTER GETTING THE VACCINE?

You will not be immediately protected so you will need to continue to wear masks, social distance and practice frequent hand hygiene. Full protection usually occurs about 2 weeks after your final dose.

The CDC has issued guidance for those considered fully vaccinated. Read those guidelines here.

IF I HAVE HAD COVID-19 SHOULD I TAKE THE VACCINE?

You can get the vaccine as long as you are no longer under isolation and your symptoms have resolved. If you have received convalescent plasma or antibody infusions, you should wait 90 days from the initial infection. Reinfection is uncommon within 90 days.

WHERE CAN I FIND MORE INFORMATION ABOUT COVID-19 VACCINES?

We understand people have questions about the vaccine. The Medical Association of Georgia (MAG) recently released some helpful information surrounding this topic.

This edition of MAG’s ‘Top Docs’ show address the crucial need for people to get vaccinated and vaccine hesitancy – including one version in English that features Longstreet Clinic’s Andrew Reisman, M.D., and one version in Spanish that features Carlos del Rio, M.D., FIDSA.

Drs. Reisman and del Rio discuss…

  • Whether today’s vaccines are safe
  • What’s in vaccines and how they work
  • Why it is crucial for people to get vaccinated
  • How the vaccines for children have evolved over the past 30 years
  • Whether there is any evidence-based link between vaccines and autism
  • How the COVID-19 vaccines differ from common vaccines
  • Reasons people don’t get vaccinated and how physicians can address those concerns
  • “Herd Immunity”

Dr. Reisman is a family medicine physician with the Longstreet Clinic, a member of the Georgia Composite Medical Board, and MAG’s immediate past president. He graduated from the MAG Foundation’s Georgia Physicians Leadership Academy in 2008. Dr. Reisman has a medical degree from the University of Miami School of Medicine, and he completed his residency at the University of Maryland.

Dr. del Rio is a professor at the Emory University School of Medicine and the executive associate dean for Emory at Grady Hospital. In addition, he is the Hubert professor and chair of the Department of Global Health at the Rollins School of Public Health and a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. del Rio is a native of Mexico, where he attended medical school at Universidad La Salle. He completed his internal medicine and infectious diseases residencies at Emory University in Atlanta.

The Spanish-speaking episode is hosted by Georgia Board for Healthcare Workforce Chair Antonio Rios, M.D., F.A.C.P., CPE, who is one of the original physicians of Northeast Georgia Physicians Group in Gainesville. Dr. Rios has a medical degree from La Salle University in Mexico, and he completed his residency and fellowship at Emory University.

WATCH

MAG ‘Top Docs’ show on vaccinations/vaccine hesitancy with Dr. Reisman

Programa MAG ‘Top Docs’ sobre vacunas/vacilaciones con el Dr. del Rio (en Español)

 

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